How to Get a Drone License in Oklahoma (Explained for Beginners)

What could you do with a drone in Oklahoma? You could take it to Oliver Park in Oklahoma City or Turkey Mountain in Tulsa. The possibilities are nearly endless, provided you have a verified license.

So, what do you need to do to obtain one? How to get a drone license in Oklahoma?

Here’s how to get a drone license in Oklahoma:

  • Meet the regulatory requirements from the FAA
  • Register for an FAA Tracking Number
  • Sign up for the test at an Oklahoma FAA Knowledge Testing Center
  • Study
  • Take the Part 107 exam and pass
  • Request your license via Form 8710-13

I bet there are more steps than you anticipated, right? That’s what a lot of new, aspiring pilots think when they first review the procedures.

It’s all a little confusing to the uninitiated, but that’s okay. You don’t have to stress. I put together this handy guide just for you.

You’ll learn what it takes to become a certified drone pilot in Oklahoma, so let’s get right into it.

Here’s how to obtain a drone license in Oklahoma

Oklahoma is a bustling state with a variety of landscapes. Its vast plains and sandstone regions are quite popular for drone videographers and photographers looking to punch up their portfolios with attention-grabbing footage.

Before you can launch your drone and begin enjoying all Oklahoma has to offer (within the legal limits, of course), you must have a drone license.

You probably want the Remote Pilot Certificate, which you can only get if you pass the Unmanned Aircraft General – Small (UAG) exam, an in-person paid test.

For your efforts, you can fly your drone commercially, meaning you can use it for financial gain, which is way cool.

Okay, so I’m sure you’re eager to get started, right? Let’s look closer at each step required to become a licensed commercial drone pilot in Oklahoma.

How I Passed Part 107 (& The Course That Helped Me do That)

How I Passed Part 107 (& The Course That Helped Me do That)

Meet the regulatory requirements from FAA

The FAA, which creates the rules and regulations around aviation throughout the United States, limits those who can take the commercial drone certification test, also known as the Part 107 exam.

It’s nothing personal; you just have to display a certain fitness to be eligible. For example, you must know English, as that’s the only language the FAA offers the test. You also have to be 16 or older to test.

The FAA requires you to have the mental and physical wherewithal to fly, as you’re putting other lives in danger if you don’t.

Register for an FAA Tracking Number

If you meet the criteria, you can move on. The second step of obtaining a commercial drone license in Oklahoma is getting an FAA Tracking Number or FTN.

Part of the FAA’s efforts to make the skies safer is having tracking numbers on all pilots. If someone breaks the law, it’s very easy to find that pilot and penalize them accordingly.

Of course, an FTN isn’t all about monitoring your drone activity. It’s also an identifier, and that’s primarily what you’ll use it for in these early stages of your commercial drone career.

You will have an FTN if you’ve ever registered with the FAA. Most of you reading this will not have one, so let’s discuss how to get it.

You need the Integrated Airman Certification and Rating Application or IACRA website for that.

Click here to get started; that link will take you to the IACRA homepage. You will see a Register link at the top of the page, near where you can log in.

After clicking that, you’ll be redirected to a page where you can select a relevant role. Choose Applicant and any other roles you associate with. Then, scroll and read IACRA’s terms of service. Click Agree to TOS and Continue to proceed.

Skip the Certificate Information section; you can add that after you get your commercial drone certificate. Don’t bypass the Personal Information or Security Questions sections. You need to fill them out to register.

The last part of the registration process is generating a username and password. Type the password a second time, click the Register button, and watch for an email from IACRA.

The email confirms your account registration. You can then log in using the credentials you created. You will see your FTN under your account information.

Sign up for the test at an Oklahoma FAA Knowledge Testing Center

I know that was a lot of red tape to cut through, so to speak, but now you’re ready to sign up to take the commercial drone exam. Well, you’re almost ready.

You need a PSI account before you confirm your testing date and location. PSI is a trustworthy testing center the FAA partners with.

You can visit the PSI website here. Click the Create an Account button, and have your FTN handy, as PSI asks for it (and your full name) to verify you. If you pass the verification (which you should), you can continue making an account on PSI.

Their registration is even more straightforward than IACRA’s. You only need to type your name, email address, and a new username and password. Click the green Continue button to proceed.

PSI will email you to verify your account. It can sometimes take a few minutes for the email to come through, and sometimes it’s known to show up in your spam filter, so check that folder if you haven’t gotten the message.

When you receive the confirmation, click the link and log in. Next, click Find a Test Center. Remember, you can only take the aeronautic knowledge test in-person, and the only places that administer the test are FAA Knowledge Testing Centers.

These spots are scattered throughout Oklahoma, so whether you live closer to Enid, Lawton, or Muskogee, you can find a Knowledge Testing Center that’s closer than you think. That’s what the Find a Test Center link achieves.

Before you can search, you have to input your zip code, country (United States, in this case), and exam type [Unmanned Aircraft General – Small (UAG)].

You can also select a distance in kilometers or miles, with options between five and 300 kilometers/miles.

Click the Search button and scroll through the results that appear. You can find more information on each Knowledge Testing Center in the results, including directions.

Choose one that works for you and confirm your testing date and time with that Knowledge Testing Center.

Study

Now it’s getting real, because you’re days or weeks away from taking your commercial drone licensing exam. This test isn’t designed to be easy; the FAA only wants the most certified pilots in the sky.

With the right study resources, you should find navigating the Part 107 exam to be less of a headache. You don’t even have to search for those resources, as we at Droneblog put them together for you here.

These courses are a culmination of scouring the internet to find only the best resources for aspiring commercial drone pilots. They make all the complex FAA jargon simpler and easier to understand.

Better yet, you can rest assured you’re learning from the best, as you will receive instruction from FAA employees and professional drone pilots.

These parties know the ropes from experience, so getting to plumb their depths of knowledge is a treat.

The courses are available at different price points, so whether you only have a small budget or you can spend as much as you wish for a course, you can find one that will augment your knowledge.

Oh yeah, and I didn’t even talk about the money-back guarantee yet. If you don’t pass after taking a beginner Part 107 course, you’ll receive a full course refund and the cost for a commercial drone exam, which is about $165.

In other words, your second attempt is free!

Take the Part 107 exam and pass

I hope you decide to take advantage of one of the beginner drone courses above, as you’ll feel ready for anything the FAA commercial exam has to throw at you.

So, what exactly awaits you when you take this test? It’s 60 multiple-choice questions, with no open-ended questions. You just bubble in your answer.

ou have two and a half hours to take the test, and that time will begin after you’re seated and provided with the testing materials.

You don’t have to bring anything extra into the testing room. You’re allowed a protractor and a basic calculator, but if you don’t have them, you can still take the test just fine. I should know – I did it!

One item you can’t have in the testing room is your phone, unsurprisingly. Leave it at home if you can, but if you must have it, make sure you put it in the locker before you take the test.

How do you pass the Unmanned Aircraft General – Small (UAG) exam? You need to score 70 percent, so you can only get 18 answers incorrect.

However, if you don’t pass this first time, you can always take the test again. In fact, the FAA doesn’t limit the number of attempts.

Just know that you must pay for each test attempt, and you have to wait at least two weeks before you can schedule the retake exam.


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Request your license via Form 8710-13

Your results will be ready on IACRA when they go live. I sincerely hope you pass, but if you don’t, dust yourself off, study harder, and try again. You’ll get there!

Now that you’ve passed, you’re readier than ever to become a commercial drone license holder in Oklahoma.

Log into IACRA to begin FAA Form 8710-13, a formal license request. You can access the form by choosing Start New Application, selecting Pilot from the dropdown menus for certifications and application, then clicking Other Path Information and Start Application.

Navigate the application prompts, inputting your Knowledge Test Exam ID and virtually signing before submitting the form. IACRA will review your information, forwarding it to the TSA for a background check.

When everything comes back clear, IACRA will email you a temporary version of your Remote Pilot Certificate.

The FAA will issue the permanent version in the mail, but this will transpire weeks later, as they have much more processing to do.

Both licenses work the same way, but you should discard the temporary license when you receive the permanent one.

I have my drone license in Oklahoma – Now what?

First of all, kudos for becoming a commercial drone pilot in Oklahoma. As you now know, the road wasn’t easy, but you got there.

Staying there requires you to have an active drone registration. FAA mandates that all commercial pilots register, so do that before you start flying, ensuring you register every drone in your fleet.

Next, you should familiarize yourself with Oklahoma’s state and local drone laws now that you know the federal laws so well.

The main law is HB 2559, which prevents drones from operating over any critical infrastructure facility below 400 feet.

Oh, and while you’re at it, have you gotten drone insurance? You’re not required to by the great state of Oklahoma, but I always recommend it for newbies.

Insurance is a great way to cover your tail if you crash into something while flying…or someone. You can save a lot of money in medical bills and repair fees with insurance!

Last, but certainly not least, you need a plan for when your drone license expires. Despite that the FAA calls the Part 107 certificate permanent, it isn’t.

It expires within two years after you receive it, and these days, you need to set aside a few hours to take a free online exam to recertify.

It’s easier and cheaper than ever, so don’t let your license lapse!